This week on The Vintage Gamer, I cover one of the few threats to Dungeons and Dragons in the fantasy role-playing game market — and one of my favorite RPGs from my past: DragonQuest.

Show Notes:

Links:

Final thoughts:

Eric Goldberg was also a co-creator of the Paranoia RPG. I should have remembered that.

This entry was posted on Monday, October 30th, 2006 at 5:45 am and is filed under Podcasts, Role-playing games. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

5 comments so far

 1 

Sorry I didn’t leave this comment a couple of weeks ago when my properly-functioning iTunes flawlessly delivered your DragonQuest podcast; I suspect that the Halloween episode, following as quickly as it did, distracted me and many others.

I played DragonQuest in college as a break from our normal AD&D game, and I loved it for all the reasons you list in your ‘cast, but I also was impressed by the organization of the rulebook. Yes, I realize that the quasi-outline style of numeric rules was/is fairly common among war simulation games like Squad Leader, et. al, but it was an innovation to me after the turgid confusion of the AD&D books.

I thought that DragonQuest was a very elegant game and I have many fond memories. For me, however, the game ended when my wereboar thief died under the proverbial ten-ton boulder trap during a game session I had to miss. Coming back to “Your character is pork jelly, dude!” kind of soured me on it…. :cry:

November 22nd, 2006 at 6:30 am
 2 

Dang, that’s pretty cold (losing your character that way).

I had forgotten to mention the organization, so thanks for bringing it up. It is certainly better than AD&D, but it still had a few issues — it took me a while to find the information about magic resistance, for example. That’s one thing (of many) the RPG industry in general has learned to do better: organize books so you can actually find the information you’re looking for.

Anyway, glad to hear of someone else who shares my experience with this great game.

November 30th, 2006 at 10:48 am
Santiago
 3 

I too found the game during a break from AD&D. Luckily, my character (Elven Conjurer) didn’t die, but he has been on ice way too long. I loved the flexiblity of the game’s character developement whereas DnD stifled what you could do with your character. My conjurer specialized in the broadsword but it was very difficult to have a wizard in DnD do that; the new feat system in the d20 version of DnD is getting closer to DQ’s flexibility. I hope Wizards of the Coast decides to d20 the game and re-introduce it.

January 13th, 2007 at 10:48 pm
 4 

Catching up on responses here…

I haven’t looked at D&Dv4 yet, but it’ll be interesting to see which direction it goes with character flexibility. I can’t see WotC re-releasing DQ — it seems pretty clear that part of the reason TSR bought SPI is to remove their biggest competitor. The only reason to d20 the game is the setting, and I don’t remember that being as compelling as the system.

April 29th, 2008 at 11:00 am
adam long
 5 

i first played dragonquest when i was about 4 or 5 yrs old, which was over 30 yrs ago. i have recently got my children into rpg’s, is there anyone who has a second hand rulebook of dragonquest in or around melbourne who would mayby part with it for some cash? ad&d? i’ve never played it, but loved playing dragonquest. and think my kids would enjoy it too.

July 14th, 2009 at 6:43 am

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